RONI FELDMAN

THE AGE OF EXPLORATION

 

Viewing art is an act of contemplative discovery.  It is akin to exploration or treasure hunting, except the riches lie in inspiring meaning and unexpected form.  My latest paintings depict famous explorers and destinations. They are all airbrushed with matte acrylic against iridescent or metallic grounds, but are obscured by different exploration of paint, collage, and found objects.  Some of the found objects include crystals, precious and semi-precious stones.  I also create sculptures out of souvenirs from my travels such as the boots I wore on the Salkantay Trail to Machu Picchu, a volcanic rock from the top of Mt. Rinjani, or a wooden mask hand-carved in Bali.  Almost every project includes some mark, material, or method that I have never tried before.  This not only requires me to be perpetually inventive, but fills each piece with unexpected treasures that partially bury the representational subject matter.  This prompts viewers to move about, look closely, and become active visual explores themselves.

Some of the swirling colors and luminous strokes are derived from what I see when I close my eyes to think or meditate. I aim to merge both inner and outer exploration.  The imagery and objects that I depict are fogged with these marks, as if looking through the cloudy lens of memory.  Something new is formed by this process, the way a guide book soaked with spilled tea, or old hiking boots scuffed with wear tells something about the journey. 

 

More than just Pluralistic tourism, my process prompts attention to difference and detail.  These paintings are less about who I painted, but the journey the eye takes through the composition. Exploration is both my form and content, because when we are impressed by something new or removed from our comfort zone, the moment is heightened.  We pay attention, creating an opportunity for reflection.

Viewing art is an act of contemplative discovery.  It is akin to exploration or treasure hunting, except the riches lie in inspiring meaning and unexpected form.  My latest paintings depict famous explorers and destinations. They are all airbrushed with matte acrylic against iridescent or metallic grounds, but are obscured by different exploration of paint, collage, and found objects.  Some of the found objects include crystals, precious and semi-precious stones.  I also create sculptures out of souvenirs from my travels such as the boots I wore on the Salkantay Trail to Machu Picchu, a volcanic rock from the top of Mt. Rinjani, or a wooden mask hand-carved in Bali.  Almost every project includes some mark, material, or method that I have never tried before.  This not only requires me to be perpetually inventive, but fills each piece with unexpected treasures that partially bury the representational subject matter.  This prompts viewers to move about, look closely, and become active visual explores themselves.

Some of the swirling colors and luminous strokes are derived from what I see when I close my eyes to think or meditate. I aim to merge both inner and outer exploration.  The imagery and objects that I depict are fogged with these marks, as if looking through the cloudy lens of memory.  Something new is formed by this process, the way a guide book soaked with spilled tea, or old hiking boots scuffed with wear tells something about the journey. 

More than just Pluralistic tourism, my process prompts attention to difference and detail.  These paintings are less about who I painted, but the journey the eye takes through the composition. Exploration is both my form and content, because when we are impressed by something new or removed from our comfort zone, the moment is heightened.  We pay attention, creating an opportunity for reflection.